Case Studies/Resources

Reducing Anxiety through Mindfulness

It’s been one month and a half that we’ve all been staying at home due to this pandemic. Most, if not all, are experiencing stress, anxiety, fear, and even grief during this situation. Going through these emotions is normal, so don’t be too hard on yourself when you feel this way. 

As employees, we still have the responsibility to do our jobs well despite these circumstances. We can’t change what is happening, and we can only change things that we can control. Healing or letting go of these emotions, however, is our responsibility. We can reduce these feelings of anxiety, fear, and grief through mindfulness. Here are some simple practices of being mindful to help you reduce these feelings. 

  1. MINDFUL WAKE UP : START YOUR DAY WITH A PURPOSE

We know days can be long even as you work from home, especially as you balance work and chores at home. Start the day by taking three long deep breaths right after you wake up. Set your intentions for the day and remind yourself of them throughout the day.

2. MINDFUL EATING: SAVOR EVERY BITE

Now you have time to eat lunch, no need to rush your lunch break. This time, savor every bite to enjoy the experience. It will help you appreciate every moment as you devour that delicious home-cooked meal.

3. MINDFUL PAUSE: REWIRE YOUR BRAIN

Do you work at home non-stop? If yes, then it is not healthy at all. It’s better to take short pauses to refresh your mind to help you focus again. 

4. MEDITATE DAILY: FIND YOUR INNER PEACE

A wandering mind is an unhappy mind.  With meditation, we can be fully present in the moment and continue to focus and concentrate on our daily work and chores.

Doing these practices will help you be more sensitive, aware and focused as these will lead to reduction of anxiety and depression and achieve a healthier physical, mental and emotional well-being. This is important so that we as employees, will be able to do our jobs well. But we also have to note that these practices must be done intentionally and consistently in order to build and sustain the practice of mindfulness. 

We also have to remember that what we’re experiencing right now is temporary and we will get though this. We just need to take things one step at a time and heal at our own pace.